The most scrumptious tender and fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits you’ll ever have! Every home cook should have a solid, homemade buttermilk biscuit recipe in their arsenal and we def recommend this one. These 6-ingredient biscuits are supremely tender, buttery, and fluffy…the coziest biscuits to accompany a variety of main dishes!

buttermilk biscuits stacked on top of each other with softened butter on the side

Friends, happiest new year to ya! Lawddd, January 2023 (like wuttt 🤯). Nevertheless, if you’re reading this, I hope you’re well and easing into this new year. This month marks 3 years of full-time entrepreneurship for Butter Be Ready, whew. It feels like a dream. A good, butter-laden dream albeit, ha. New year, new recipes, and much more…big thanks to all of you sweet readers!

Tender & Fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits

Listen, a good buttermilk biscuit is like a swoon-worthy chocolate chip cookie. Homemade biscuits might cause one to sweat and run for those store-bought refrigerated biscuits (ahem, and ain’t nothing at all wrong with them btw!). However, scratch-made biscuits are truly phenomenal, peeps. Buttermilk biscuits are a quintessential southern staple and downright delicious.

These extra tender, fluffy biscuits are made with 6-ingredients that you likely have on hand. Homemade buttermilk biscuits are a lot easier than you think; I got you covered with step-by-step photos and plenty of tips galore! ♡

More recipes: creamy black-eyed peas, reader-fave fried cabbage and sausage, weeknight staples like parmesan crusted chicken, easy stovetop mac and cheese, and this delicious pesto pasta with turkey meatballs– yummo.

tender and fluffy buttermilk biscuits on parchment paper

Ingredients Needed For This Recipe

(Note: the full ingredients list, including measurements, is provided in the recipe card directly below.)

  • Cake or pastry flour: For the most tender biscuits, I recommend using either cake flour or pastry flour. These types of flour produce an extra tender, melt-in-your-mouth baked good because of the lower protein content associated with them as opposed to traditional all-purpose flour. Feel free to use all-purpose flour as a substitute, but be mindful of my note on overall biscuit texture. We’ll chat much more on this, further below.
  • Baking powder: For the fluffiest, mile-high biscuits. Baking powder is the leavening agent of choice, preferably aluminum-free. Most folks probably aren’t even aware of this, but some baking powder brands have an aluminum ingredient in them. That ingredient can cause baked goods, like biscuits, to have a bitter, tinny, metal taste…that vibe is not welcome in our biscuits.
  • Sugar & salt: Both to provide a depth of flavor in the biscuit dough.
  • Butter: You’ll need some cold butter that’s straight from the fridge. If you can, aim for good-quality butter for richness since it’s one of the main stars. I’m a big fan of Kerrygold Pure Irish butter and Plugra butter brands!
  • Buttermilk: We simply cannot make us a batch of buttermilk biscuits without buttermilk. This ingredient provides acidity (lactic acid) to break down the gluten in the dough. Additionally, it acts as a wonderful tenderizer for the dreamiest, extra soft biscuits with a bit of a tang. Buttermilk is life!

How To Make Buttermilk Biscuits

(Note: please see the recipe card directly below for the complete written instructions.)

  • In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, granulated sugar, and sea salt and whisk until well blended. Add the butter into the bowl and toss to coat.
  • Then use a pastry blender to cut the butter into the flour, or pinch it with your fingertips, smearing the butter into the flour.

BBR Biscuit-making tip #1: The key to making biscuits is to work quickly with purpose. Making homemade buttermilk biscuits is a fairly easy and straightforward process. When you have your mise en place (ingredients in place/gathered), you don’t want to take a lackadaisical approach.

Moving with haste will ensure the cold ingredients are easy to work with and everything comes together nicely.

  • Continue this process until you see shaggy flecks throughout the flour.
  • Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the buttermilk. Gently mix using one hand or a rubber spatula, bringing the flour from the sides of the bowl into the buttermilk, just until a shaggy dough forms.

BBR Biscuit-making tip #2: Mix the buttermilk into the dough *just* until the dough forms. Mixing and mixing and mixing can lead to tough biscuits.

  • Dust your work surface with a bit of flour and turn the dough out of the bowl onto the surface.
  • Use lightly floured hands to knead the dough, using the heel of your palms to work the dough just until it comes together, careful not to overwork. The biscuit dough should go from shaggy-like to a fully incorporated mass.

BBR Biscuit-making tip #3: This is where the biscuit dough transforms from a shaggy-looking mess to a more solid, dough mass. Again, you want to knead the dough *just* until it comes together, careful not to overwork.

  • Using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll the dough into a 6 by 13-inch rectangle, until about 1-inch thick.
  • Use a bench scraper or sharp knife to cut the dough into 3-inch square biscuits or use a round 3-inch biscuit cutter for round-shaped biscuits (there might be some leftover dough, scraps can be re-rolled as needed).

BBR Biscuit-making tip #4: If using a biscuit cutter, it’s tempting to want to twist the cutter, but don’t. Instead, punch down on the dough and straight out with not a single twist motion! Why? The twisting motion seals the biscuit edges which can cause the biscuits to not achieve a good enough rise.

  • Place the shaped biscuits onto the prepared baking sheet, arranging them about a 1/2-inch apart so the biscuits have room to puff up and rise.
  • Then place them into the freezer to chill for at least 15 minutes while the oven is still preheating.

BBR Biscuit-making tip #5: Do not skip the freezing step. After working the dough, the butter will have softened and the chill time ensures that the butter solidifies again. Plus, the colder they are, the higher they rise!

  • Take biscuits out of the freezer. Use a pastry brush to lightly brush the top of each biscuit with melted butter and a pinch of flaky salt.
  • Bake the frozen biscuits for 30 minutes, rotating the baking sheet after 15 minutes- until the biscuits have risen, and are golden brown. Serve hot out of the oven (ideally the best timing!) with a generous smear of softened butter or other accoutrements, if desired. Enjoy!

BBR Biscuit-making tip #6: That extra touch of the melted butter and flaky salt is the icing on the proverbial cake…in this case, biscuit. The frozen biscuits soak up that extra buttery topping so beautifully…swoon 🧈

tender and fluffy buttermilk biscuits lined up on parchment paper

Let’s Talk About Types Of Flour

Not all flour is the same, so let’s discuss. Cake flour and pastry flour are considered fine-textured soft flours with a lower protein content than traditional all-purpose flour. Pastry flour has approximately 9 percent protein, and cake flour comes in a bit lower at 7-8 percent. And traditional, pantry staple all-purpose flour has about 10-12 percent. ⇢ The lower the protein content (less gluten), the more tender, light, and airy baked goods will be.

For the most luscious, tender-crumb buttermilk biscuits, I recommend using cake flour or pastry flour. But can I use all-purpose flour as a sub? Yes, all-purpose flour can be used interchangeably here. However, for the best textured biscuits that are tender and fluffy, use cake/pastry flour, friends 👌🏾

Notes, FAQs & More On Biscuits

You may have additional questions about this buttermilk biscuits recipe. Like other recipes, I always advise sticking to the recipe as it is written in the recipe card directly below. However, here’s some extra info you might find helpful:

  • Can I use all-purpose flour? Again, yes, but cake or pastry flour is recommended for the most fluffy, tender-crumb buttermilk biscuits.
  • Troubleshooting your biscuit dough: While biscuits are straightforward, you might encounter some issues. Typical issues can be dry dough or sticky dough. If you find your dough to be too dry, use a touch more buttermilk, just enough to bring the dough together. Alternatively, if your dough feels too sticky, add a touch more flour, just enough to prevent stickiness. Badda bing, badda boom…biscuit dough is easy to remedy if needed, no worries.
  • Storing leftover biscuits: Keep leftover biscuits stored inside of an airtight bag or container. They’ll keep on the counter or in the fridge for 4-5 days.
  • Can I freeze unbaked biscuits? If you don’t want to bake all your biscuits off at one time, yes. Store unbaked biscuits inside of an airtight baggie and they’ll keep frozen for 2-3 months. The frozen biscuits can be baked right away, no need to thaw, just add a few more minutes to their baking time.
  • Can I freeze leftover baked biscuits? Yes! Make sure the baked buttermilk biscuits have cooled completely, first. Then wrap each biscuit tightly in plastic wrap then foil (a good measure to prevent freezer burn!) and they’ll keep in the freezer for 2-3 months. When ready, thaw in the fridge (or at room temp!) and reheat in the microwave until warmed through.
  • Cast-iron skillet baking: Sometimes I like to place my biscuits inside of a cast-iron skillet to bake. Because of that cast-iron, magical touch, the underside will take on an even crispier bottom, gahhh.
black hand grabbing buttermilk biscuit on plate

There really is no Southern delight like a good ole Buttermilk Biscuit, y’all. They’re just so dang good, yuh! Be sure to tag @butterbeready in your BBR recipe creations, I sure love to see it when you do. Until next time! 🤟🏾

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black hand grabbing buttermilk biscuit on plate

Tender & Fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star 5 from 1 review
  • Author: Quin Liburd
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 1216 biscuits 1x
  • Category: Breakfast, Brunch
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: Southern
Save Recipe

Description

The most scrumptious tender and fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits you’ll ever have! Every home cook should have a solid, homemade buttermilk biscuit recipe in their arsenal and we def recommend this one. These 6-ingredient biscuits are supremely tender, buttery, and fluffy…the coziest biscuits to accompany a variety of main dishes!


Ingredients

Scale
  • 5 1/2 cups cake or pastry flour, plus extra for hands & work surface
  • 3 tablespoons baking powder, aluminum-free
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 4 teaspoons fine sea salt
  • 1 1/2 cups (3 sticks) very cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes
  • 2 cups cold whole buttermilk

For topping & finishing biscuitsoptional:

  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted- for brushing tops
  • flaky salt- for sprinkling tops
  • for serving: softened butter, honey, agave nectar, maple/sorghum/alaga syrup, assorted jams & jellies, etc.

Instructions

  1. Position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat the oven to 400°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and then set aside.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, granulated sugar, and sea salt and whisk until well blended. Add the butter into the bowl and toss to coat. Then use a pastry blender to cut the butter into the flour, or pinch it with your fingertips, smearing the butter into the flour. Continue this process until you see shaggy flecks throughout the flour.
  3. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the buttermilk. Gently mix together using one hand or a rubber spatula, bringing the flour from the sides of the bowl into the buttermilk, just until a shaggy dough forms.
  4. Dust your work surface with a bit of flour and turn the dough out of the bowl onto the surface. Use lightly floured hands to knead the dough, using the heel of your palms to work the dough just until it comes together, careful not to overwork. The biscuit dough should go from shaggy-like to a fully incorporated mass.
  5. Using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll the dough into a 6 by 13-inch rectangle, until about 1-inch thick. Use a bench scraper or sharp knife to cut the dough into 3-inch square biscuits or use a round 3-inch biscuit cutter for round-shaped biscuits. (Tip: Do not twist the biscuit cutter. The twisting motion seals the biscuit edges which can cause the biscuits to not achieve a good enough rise). This recipe makes 12 large biscuits or about 16 medium-sized biscuits. There might be some leftover dough, scraps can be re-rolled as needed.
  6. Place the shaped biscuits onto the prepared baking sheet, arranging them about a 1/2-inch apart so the biscuits have room to puff up and rise. Then place them into the freezer to chill for at least 15 minutes while the oven is still preheating. >> Note: do not skip the freezing step. After working the dough, the butter will have softened and the chill time ensures that the butter solidifies again. Plus, the colder they are, the higher they rise…chilled biscuits, chef’s kiss!
  7. Take biscuits out of the freezer. Use a pastry brush to lightly brush the top of each biscuit with melted butter and a pinch of flaky salt.
  8. Bake the frozen biscuits for 30 minutes, rotating the baking sheet after 15 minutes- until the biscuits have risen, and are golden brown. Serve hot out of the oven (ideally the best timing!) or at room temperature with a generous smear of softened butter or other accoutrements, if desired. Enjoy!

Notes

  1. A note on flour: For the most tender biscuits, I recommend using either cake flour or pastry flour. These types of flour produce an extra tender, melt-in-your-mouth baked good because of the lower protein content associated with them as opposed to traditional all-purpose flour. Feel free to use all-purpose flour as a substitute, but be mindful of my note on biscuit texture. More on this in blog post.
  2. Biscuit servings: This recipe makes 12 large biscuits or about 16 medium-sized biscuits, depending on how you cut/stamp the dough.
  3. Storing leftover biscuits: Keep leftover biscuits stored inside of an airtight bag or container. They’ll keep on the counter or in the fridge for 4-5 days.
  4. Can I freeze unbaked biscuits? If you don’t want to bake all your biscuits off at one time, yes. Store unbaked biscuits inside of an airtight baggie and they’ll keep frozen for 2-3 months. The frozen biscuits can be baked right away, no need to thaw, just add a few more minutes to their baking time.
  5. Can I freeze leftover baked biscuits? Yes! Make sure the baked buttermilk biscuits have cooled completely, first. Then wrap each biscuit tightly in plastic wrap then foil (a good measure to prevent freezer burn!) and they’ll keep in the freezer for 2-3 months. When ready, thaw in the fridge (or at room temp!) and reheat in the microwave until warmed through.
  6. Please read blog post in its entirety for more tips + tricks.