A pot of this Stewed Black-Eyed Peas with Collard Greens & Cornbread Biscuits is like a warm hug made edible. You’ll love this recipe that’s filled with soul food favorites like filling black-eyed peas, hearty smoked meat, and braised greens. Made complete with a topping of extra tender, fluffy cornbread biscuits. This dish is loaded with flavor and the perfect, comfy-cozy meal that everyone will rejoice for!

stewed black eyed peas with greens and cornbread biscuits in blue flower bowl

I went to the farmers market the other day and rolled up on one of my favorite vendors. He’s a local farmer that sells the best beans and peas in town. We got to talking about all sorts of his goods when another patron strolled over and quickly went for some light green-ish lookin’ peas. She looked at me and said, “You’ve gotta get some of these lady peas!” Needless to say, I definitely bought some after hearing everyone sing their praise, ha. I love me some peas!

Stewed Black-Eyed Peas with Greens & Cornbread Biscuits (amen, amen, amen!) 🙌🏾

Y’all are going to love this recipe, like for real, for real. There’s so much deliciousness in this one-pot dish. We’ve got tender black-eyed peas stewed alongside collard greens and hearty smoked meat in a rich pot liquor. If that ain’t enough, there’s effortless cornbread drop biscuits sitting pretty on top of it all. It’s so filling, flavor-filled, and the coziest meal that hits the soul just right.

My Creamy Black-Eyed Peas recipe is like a Southern side dish for black-eyed peas. However, this stewed black-eyed peas recipe is a complete meal!

⇢ More recipes: rosemary sweet potato rolls, the coziest gnocchi bolognese, juicy roasted jamaican jerk chicken, skillet chicken pot pie w/ biscuits, dreamy braised short ribs, and these chicken piccata meatballs– oh yeah!

stewed black eyed peas with greens and cornbread biscuits in large purple pot

A Little About These Peas & More

Black-eyed peas, despite their name, are technically classified as a legume and not peas. However, both peas and beans are considered to be legumes because of their edible seeds/pods. Black-eyed peas originated in West Africa and made its way over to the West Indies and then to the American South (Lowcountry region and Sea Islands of the Carolinas as well as Georgia) via enslaved people.

These same enslaved Africans planted these peas in gardens as they were considered an economical type of fare. During the Civil War, these peas were often eaten in soups and stews while also being used to feed animals on the farm. Fast forward to today, black-eyed peas have maintained their status in the Black community as well as a beloved tradition in the South.

Black-Eyed Peas & Southern Traditions

For years and years, specifically in the South; eating black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day is a symbol of calling in good luck. Also, combining your peas with collard greens represents money (green) for a financially prosperous year as well; and cornbread represents gold. Eating this trio is a time-honored, Southern tradition that dates back to centuries. *I love that this stewed black-eyed peas recipe infuses all 3 Southern customs in one pot! 😛

Are Black-Eyed Peas Healthy?

Yes! Black-eyed peas have a ton of health benefits and hold plenty nutritional value as well. They are an excellent source of protein, fiber, folate, potassium, and calcium to name a few. Many of these benefits come from just one cup of cooked peas, too! Additionally, they even help to improve digestion, prevent anemia, lower blood pressure, and improve skin/eye health as well. For more health-related information from registered dietitians, check out this and this.

ingredients for stewed black eyed peas on beige surface

What You’ll Need For This Recipe

(Note: the full ingredients list, including measurements, is provided in the recipe card directly below.)

  • Oil: Use vegetable or canola oil for browning/sautéing. However, rendered bacon fat or duck fat will work, too. Those will add more flavor and depth!
  • Smoked meat: This is what makes these stewed black-eyed peas so freakin’ delish. The addition of smoked meat provides a heartiness and extra-filling richness. I use smoked ham hocks or turkey wings for my stewed peas, but you can also use pieces of salt pork, bacon, or any other smoked meat.
  • Mirepoix: A classic, aromatic mixture of onion, carrot, and celery.
  • Garlic: No explanation needed…garlic is #bae, garlic is life!
  • Fresh thyme: Herbs like fresh thyme add a fragrant pop in stew recipes. These herbs are in the stew mixture and in the cornbread biscuits, yum.
  • Cajun Seasoning: This type of seasoning is a very flavorful blend that contains salt, red pepper, black pepper, garlic, and more. Brands such as, Slap Ya Mama or Tony Chachere’s, stay in my kitchen pantry.
  • Chicken broth: Flavor on flavor! This is one of the elements that makes the pot liquor so delicious. I like to use low-sodium because the cajun seasoning in the stew will give us plenty of salty vibes already.
  • Black-eyed peas: The main star! So delicious and packed with nutrients!
  • Collard greens: Fresh chopped greens for extra nourishment and because black-eyed peas and cornbread just pair divinely with them 🥬
  • For the cornbread biscuits: Self-rising flour, cornmeal, thyme, cajun seasoning, milk, and melted butter. So easy, so simple!

Soaking Beans/Peas 101: What Gives?

Ahhh to soak or not to soak, that is the question. Some people swear by soaking their peas before cooking and others say nah. ⇢ Why soak peas? Okay so boom, soaking peas prior to cooking them allows for the peas to cook evenly and faster. In addition to that, soaked peas are also easier to digest. You see, soaking them allows for the complex sugars within the peas to break down, therefore reducing indigestion (and gas). An extra step but oh so worth it!

How To Soak Your Peas: Two Ways

⇢ There are ✌🏾 methods to get those peas right for stewed black-eyed peas!

  • Overnight soak: Add the peas to a large bowl and cover with cool water. Then let them soak overnight on the counter, about 8 hours. After soaking, simply drain and set aside until called for in the recipe card, below.
  • Quick soak: Bring about 6-7 cups of water to a boil in a large pot. Then add in the peas and remove the pot from heat. Let the peas soak in the hot water for 30 minutes to 1 hour. Afterwards, simply drain the peas and set aside until called for in the recipe card, below.

*I fully recommend & highly suggest soaking your black-eyed peas, y’all!

cornbread biscuit batter in large white bowl with silver spoon

How To Make Stewed Black-Eyed Peas

(Note: please see the recipe card directly below for the complete written instructions.)

  1. Brown the smoked meat. Heat the oil in a large dutch oven or stock pot. Swirl pot to evenly coat and add in the smoked meat and cook until a golden-brown sear appears, about 2-3 minutes on each side.
  2. Sauté the aromatics & bring flavors together. Add in the onion, carrot, and celery. Sauté with the meat, stirring often, until the aromatics soften and become tender, about 3-4 minutes. Then add in the garlic, fresh thyme, broth, and season the pot with cajun seasoning-to taste.
  3. Simmer the smoked meat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cover the pot with a lid. Let the meat simmer for 1 hour, undisturbed.
  4. Tear up the meat. Remove the meat from the pot and set aside to cool down for a few minutes before handling. Then use a fork or your hands to tear the meat off the bones, adding the pieces of meat back into the pot.
  5. Build the stew. Add the pre-soaked black-eyed peas and collard greens into the pot, stirring to combine. Cover the pot and allow the peas + greens to braise over medium-low heat for 1 hour.
  6. Taste test & adjust. After simmering, the peas + greens should be perfectly tender. Taste the mixture and adjust seasoning to preference.
  7. Prepare the biscuit batter. In a large bowl, combine the flour, cornmeal, cajun seasoning, and thyme. Add the milk and butter and stir until combined and a sticky batter forms. Scoop heaping tablespoons of batter onto the top of the stew mixture.
  8. Finish stew. Cover the pot and simmer over medium heat until the drop biscuits have risen and are cooked through, about 15 minutes.
  9. Serve stewed black-eyed peas with cornbread biscuits immediately, and top with a few dashes of hot sauce, if desired. Enjoy!
stewed black eyed peas with cornbread biscuits in large pot

Why This Stewed Black-Eyed Peas Recipe Works (& Why You’ll Love It!) ♡

Here’s why you’ll adore these stewed black-eyed peas with greens & biscuits, friends:

  1. Flavorrr on flava…There’s tons of flavors, textures, and heartwarming goodness found here that you will enjoy. Peas cooked in a rich and robust pot liquor (broth) with braised greens, hearty pieces of smoked meat, and tender cornbread biscuits to soak it all up.
  2. Low-effort, high-reward…I say this phrase a lot and it always applies to recipes like this one. There isn’t a whole lot of work here. Aside from browning/sautéing and tearing up the meat, this recipe is almost effortless. The magic of a stew- just like my brown stew chicken and oxtail stew! It is a true low-effort dish with a high-reward to add into your rotation! 🙌🏾
  3. One-pot stunner…Aside from mixing the biscuit batter, this entire recipe comes together in ONE single vessel. Serve from stovetop to dinner table!
  4. Soul food lovers…This one is for you! Every element within this dish is full of soul food staples all strewn into one meal- whew.

How To Store & Reheat Your Stewed Black-Eyed Peas with Collard Greens & Cornbread Biscuits

Storing in refrigerator: Transfer leftovers into an airtight container. They will keep in the fridge for about 3-4 days. You can reheat in the oven at 300°F or in the microwave until warmed through completely. You might need to add a splash of more broth/water to loosen the stew.

Freezing stewed black-eyed peas: Make sure the stew has cooled down completely. Then transfer the stewed black-eyed peas into an airtight container or in freezer-safe bags (than can be flattened like a pillow). I recommend freezing the cornbread biscuits separately. When ready, defrost/thaw in the fridge overnight and reheat as needed. You might need to add a splash of more broth/water to loosen. This recipe will keep for 3 months in the freezer.

black hands with gold spoon digging into a bowl of stewed black eyed peas

I mean, this Stewed Black-Eyed Peas recipe is truly the best…and it’s with collard greens + cornbread biscuits- c’mon. Be sure to tag @butterbeready in your BBR recipe creations, I sure love to see it when you do. Until next time! 🤟🏾

Love dat southern goodness? Yeah, I know you do, don’t miss:

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon
stewed black eyed peas with greens and cornbread biscuits in blue flower bowl

Stewed Black-Eyed Peas with Collard Greens & Cornbread Biscuits

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star 5 from 3 reviews
  • Author: Quin Liburd
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 2 hours 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 2 hours 35 minutes
  • Yield: 6 1x
  • Category: Main Course
  • Method: Stovetop, Stew
  • Cuisine: Southern
Save Recipe

Description

A pot of this Stewed Black-Eyed Peas with Collard Greens & Cornbread Biscuits is like a warm hug made edible. You’ll love this recipe that’s filled with soul food favorites like filling black-eyed peas, hearty smoked meat, and braised greens. Made complete with a topping of extra tender, fluffy cornbread biscuits. This dish is loaded with flavor and the perfect, comfy-cozy meal that everyone will rejoice for!


Ingredients

Scale
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable or canola oil
  • 2 lbs smoked meat, such as ham hocks or turkey wings
  • 1 medium white onion, chopped
  • 2 large carrots, chopped
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced or pressed
  • 6 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 8 cups low-sodium chicken broth, plus more as needed- see notes
  • cajun seasoning, to taste
  • 1 lb dried black-eyed peas, pre-soaked & then drained
  • 2 handfuls fresh chopped collard greens
  • hot sauce, for serving- if desired

For the cornbread drop biscuits:

  • 1 1/4 cup self-rising flour – see notes
  • 1/2 cup fine yellow cornmeal
  • 1/2 teaspoon cajun seasoning
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme or 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 cup whole milk, room temperature 
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted & lightly cooled

Instructions

  1. Brown the smoked meat & sauté the aromatics. Heat the oil in a large dutch oven or stock pot over medium-high heat. Once the oil shimmers, gently swirl the pot to evenly coat the bottom. Add in the smoked ham hocks/turkey wings and cook until a golden-brown sear appears, about 2-3 minutes on each side.
  2. Add in the onion, carrot, and celery. Sauté with the meat, stirring often, until the aromatics soften and become tender, about 3-4 minutes. Then add in the garlic, fresh thyme, broth, and season the pot with cajun seasoning-to taste. The smoked meat should be fully or almost fully submerged under the broth.
  3. Simmer the smoked meat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cover the pot with a lid. Let the meat simmer for 1 hour, undisturbed.
  4. Tear up the meat. After simmering, the smoked meat should be very tender. Carefully remove the meat from the pot and set aside to cool down for a few minutes before handling. At this stage, reduce the heat on the pot to the lowest setting while you work on the meat. Then use a fork or your hands (fitted with disposable gloves, if desired) to tear the meat off the bones. Discard the bones along with any excess fatty parts and add the pieces of meat back into the pot.
  5. Build the stew. Add the pre-soaked black-eyed peas and collard greens into the pot. Stir well to combine all ingredients together. Cover the pot with lid and allow the peas + greens to braise over medium-low heat for 1 hour.
  6. Adjust stew to preference. Give the peas a taste test and make sure they’re cooked through. If the peas are not yet tender, continue simmering for a bit longer. The greens should be nice and tender as well. Taste the mixture and adjust seasoning to preference with more cajun seasoning, if desired. If you see that some of the liquid has evaporated and you’d like a looser stew consistency, add more broth in to replenish the pot to your liking.
  7. Meanwhile, prepare the biscuit batter. In a large bowl, combine the flour, cornmeal, cajun seasoning, and thyme. Add the milk and butter and stir until combined and a sticky batter forms. Scoop heaping tablespoons of batter onto the top of the stew mixture.
  8. Finish stew. Cover the pot and simmer over medium heat until the drop biscuits have risen and are cooked through, about 15 minutes.
  9. Serve stewed black-eyed peas with cornbread biscuits in bowls, and top with a few dashes of hot sauce, if desired. Enjoy!

Notes

  1. For cajun seasoning, I use Slap Ya Mama or Tony Chachere’s.
  2. 8 cups of chicken broth is about 2 (32-ounce) cartons.
  3. If you don’t have self-rising flour, you can sub with all-purpose flour & then add about 1 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder to the biscuit batter (replaces the leavening that is present in self-rising flour).
  4. Please read the blog post in its entirety for more tips + tricks.
stewed black eyed peas with cornbread biscuits in blue flower bowl